Una visión diferente para disfrutar de la magia del Universo
Astronomía - Cosmología - Astrofotografía - Astrofísica - Exploración Espacial

💫El mejor navegador para visualizar Universo Mágico desde dispositivos móviles es Duck Duck Go, búscalo en la App Store o en Google Play.

💫Universo Mágico premia la calidad de los astrofotografos mediante un Reconocimiento a su labor. 

💫Los aficionados ya pueden escribir sobre astronomía. Date de alta como Autor en Universo Mágico Público. 

 ðŸ’«Si eres Autor prueba la opción Nueva Entrada

💫HR 6819





This wide-field view shows the region of the sky, in the constellation of Telescopium, where HR 6819 can be found, a triple system consisting of two stars and the closest black hole to Earth ever found. This view was created from images forming part of the Digitized Sky Survey 2. While the black hole is invisible, the two stars in HR 6819 can be viewed from the southern hemisphere on a dark, clear night without binoculars or a telescope.

Credit:     ESO / Digitized Sky Survey 2 / Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin

Facebook Groups

💫Smith tied to the RMS


Facebook Groups

Astronaut Steven L. Smith, payload commander, retrieves a power tool while standing on the mobile foot restraint at the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS). The RMS arm is 50 feet 3 inches long and 15 inches in diameter and has six degrees of freedom. It weighs 905 pounds, and the total system weighs 994 pounds. The RMS has six joints that correspond roughly to the joints of the human arm, with shoulder yaw and pitch joints; an elbow pitch joint; and wrist pitch, yaw and roll joints. The end effector is the unit at the end of the wrist that actually grabs, or grapples, the payload. The two lightweight boom segments are called the upper and lower arms. The upper boom connects the shoulder and elbow joints, and the lower boom connects the elbow and wrist joints. The RMS arm attaches to the orbiter payload bay longeron at the shoulder manipulator positioning mechanism. Power and data connections are located at the shoulder MPM.



 The RMS is capable of deploying or retrieving payloads weighing up to 65,000 pounds. The RMS can also retrieve, repair and deploy satellites; provide a mobile extension ladder for extravehicular activity crew members for work stations or foot restraints; and be used as an inspection aid to allow the flight crew members to view the orbiter's or payload's surfaces through a television camera on the RMS. The basic RMS configuration consists of a manipulator arm; an RMS display and control panel, including rotational and translational hand controllers at the orbiter aft flight deck flight crew station; and a manipulator controller interface unit that interfaces with the orbiter computer. One flight crew member operates the RMS from the aft flight deck control station, and a second flight crew member usually assists with television camera operations. This allows the RMS operator to view RMS operations through the aft flight deck payload and overhead windows and through the closed-circuit television monitors at the aft flight deck station. Spar Aerospace Ltd., a Canadian company, designed, developed, tested and built the RMS. CAE Electronics Ltd. in Montreal provides electronic interfaces, servoamplifiers and power conditioners. Dilworth, Secord, Meagher and Assoc. Ltd. in Toronto is responsible for the RMS end effector. Rockwell International's Space Transportation Systems Division designed, developed, tested and built the systems used to attach the RMS to the payload bay of the orbiter. 

Credit: NASA / ESA

💫NGC 470 & NGC 474





Located around 100 million light-years away in the constellation of Pisces (The Fish), the galaxy to the upper-left of this image is named NGC 474. It is a stunning example of a shell elliptical galaxy; enormous wispy tails flick around the galaxy’s main body, while the inner structure is formed of a series of nested concentric rings. In fact, the full extent of the galaxy cannot even be contained in this field of view. The tendril-like outer regions of NGC 474 billow and wisp away like smoke, extending outwards for large distances from the galaxy’s main bulk. Astronomers are unsure why some galaxies take on this kind of appearance and structure, but they believe it concerns gravity , namely, how nearby galaxies gravitationally interact with one another. It is possible that the spiral galaxy to the lower-right, NGC 470, has been tugging on its larger friend for billions of years, causing density waves to reshape its structure.

Credit:     ESO


Visit:
Astroimaging (Facebook
Astronomy Plus (Facebook
Astronomy & Space exploration (Facebook) 

💫Stephan's Quintet


Facebook Groups

A clash among members of a famous galaxy quintet reveals an assortment of stars across a wide colour range, from young, blue stars to aging, red stars. This portrait of Stephan's Quintet, also known as the Hickson Compact Group 92, was taken by the new Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Stephan's Quintet, as the name implies, is a group of five galaxies. The name, however, is a bit of a misnomer. Studies have shown that group member NGC 7320, at upper left, is actually a foreground galaxy that is about seven times closer to Earth than the rest of the group. Three of the galaxies have distorted shapes, elongated spiral arms, and long, gaseous tidal tails containing myriad star clusters, proof of their close encounters.



These interactions have sparked a frenzy of star birth in the central pair of galaxies. This drama is being played out against a rich backdrop of faraway galaxies. The image, taken in visible and near-infrared light, showcases WFC3's broad wavelength range. The colours trace the ages of the stellar populations, showing that star birth occurred at different epochs, stretching over hundreds of millions of years. The camera's infrared vision also peers through curtains of dust to see groupings of stars that cannot be seen in visible light. NGC 7319, at top right, is a barred spiral with distinct spiral arms that follow nearly 180 degrees back to the bar. The blue specks in the spiral arm at the top of NGC 7319 and the red dots just above and to the right of the core are clusters of many thousands of stars. Most of the Quintet is too far away even for Hubble to resolve individual stars. Continuing clockwise, the next galaxy appears to have two cores, but it is actually two galaxies, NGC 7318A and NGC 7318B. Encircling the galaxies are young, bright blue star clusters and pinkish clouds of glowing hydrogen where infant stars are being born. These stars are less than 10 million years old and have not yet blown away their natal cloud. Far away from the galaxies, at right, is a patch of intergalactic space where many star clusters are forming.

NGC 7317, at bottom left, is a normal-looking elliptical galaxy that is less affected by the interactions. harply contrasting with these galaxies is the dwarf galaxy NGC 7320 at upper left. Bursts of star formation are occurring in the galaxy's disc, as seen by the blue and pink dots. In this galaxy, Hubble can resolve individual stars, evidence that NGC 7320 is closer to Earth. NGC 7320 is 40 million light-years from Earth. The other members of the Quintet reside about 300 million light-years away in the constellation Pegasus. These more distant members are markedly redder than the foreground galaxy, suggesting that older stars reside in their cores. The stars' light also may be further reddened by dust stirred up in the encounters. Spied by Edouard M. Stephan in 1877, Stephan's Quintet is the first compact group ever discovered. WFC3 observed the Quintet in July and August 2009. The composite image was made by using filters that isolate light from the blue, green and infrared portions of the spectrum, as well as emission from ionised hydrogen. These Hubble observations are part of the Hubble Servicing Mission 4 Early Release Observations. NASA astronauts installed the WFC3 camera during a servicing mission in May to upgrade and repair the 19-year-old Hubble telescope.

Credit: NASA / ESA and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team

💫NGC 3532





The MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at La Silla Observatory in Chile captured this richly colourful view of the bright star cluster NGC 3532. Some of the stars still shine with a hot bluish colour, but many of the more massive ones have become red giants and glow with a rich orange hue.

Credit:     ESO / G. Beccari


Visit:
Astroimaging (Facebook
Astronomy Plus (Facebook
Astronomy & Space exploration (Facebook) 

💫NGC 7049


Facebook Groups

The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of NGC 7049 in the constellation of Indus, in the southern sky. A family of globular clusters appears as glittering spots dusted around the galaxy halo.



Astronomers study the globular clusters in NGC 7049 to learn more about its formation and evolution. The dust lanes, which appear as a lacy web, are dramatically backlit by the millions of stars in the halo of NGC 7049.

Credit: NASA / ESA / W. Harris (McMaster University, Ontario, Canada)







Cada imagen expuesta en Universo Mágico tiene derechos de autor, para utilizar estas imágenes en otros sitios web debe pedir permiso al autor de la imagen, enlazado en éste sitio.
Los datos de posición y magnitud cambian con el tiempo, tu puedes consultar los datos actualizados haciendo click en el enlace a Simbad en las tablas de datos.
Para visualizar correctamente este sitio web utiliza un navegador basado en Chromium, o Fire Fox. Si te gusta la privacidad se recomienda utilizar Tor Browser.
El mejor navegador para visualizar Universo Mágico desde dispositivos móviles es Duck Duck Go, búscalo en la App Store o en Google Play.
Para la correcta visualización de la página de Husos Horarios utiliza Internet Explorer.
Universo Mágico es un sitio web sin publicidad, y todos los enlaces a sitios web externos ó anuncios eventuales son gratuitos sin remuneración.
Universo Mágico no ingresa dinero ó beneficios por nigún concepto, y debe ser tratado como un sitio web personal sin ánimo de lucro.
Universo Mágico hace uso de la base de datos astronómicos SIMBAD operado desde CDS, Estrasburgo, Francia



universo cosmos espacio astonomía cosmología exploración espacial astrofotografía astrofotógrafo astrónomo cosmólogo nebulosa galaxia nube oscura brillante estrella estrellas cúmulo estelar abierto globular planeta sol mercurio venus tierra marte júpiter saturno urano neptuno plutón ceres fobos deimos luna titán encelado europa calisto ganímedes ío caronte hydra nix cometa asteroide cinturón grupo galáctico supercúmulo planetaria emisión reflexión absorción polvo gas atmósfera rayos X gamma cuásar púlsar herbig-haro constelación asterismo fugaces meteoros meteoritos satélite iss estación cohete telescopio hubble chandra spitzer nustar xmm-newton wise most very vlt vla vst vista herschel soar ssro sloan rosetta rosat philae osiris subaru campanas kitt keck wilson observatorio palomar calar horizons voyager mpg mycron merlin maven express mariner magellan juno grand canarias gemini hawk galileo galex gaia fuse digited dawn clementine cassini apolo apex alma agujero agujeros polo norte sur sistema solar vacío local big bang oculta coronalunar solar cráter superluna sangre eclipse total parcial ocultación luminiscencia refracción destello anular tránsito protuberancia filamento mancha manchas solares andrómeda messier enana física físico ngc ic trío arp melotte doradus barnard pilares trompa burbuja nuro cabeza cisne cygnus sh2 shapley mz rho sagittarius tarántula magallanes gran pequeña triángulo pickering torre variable binaria espectroscópica bennu thule carinae cygnicom coma virgo cuarteto quinteto cadena energía color markarian tritón molecular supernova nova remanente explosión frente choque einstein caldwell darwin huygens ptolomeo halley piggot gillett hale riccioli gentil newton bode kepler dreyer harding copérnico lacaille loys pierre hawking ciencia científicos cielo arcoiris lenticular espiral elíptica barrada brazo brazos región regiones vdb rcw año luz parsec grado grados celsius farenheit kelvin minuto minutos arco arcominutos oculta llena oscura partículas átomo átomos temperatura millones miles luz espectro universe cosmos space astonomy cosmology space exploration astrophotography astrophotographer astronomer cosmologist nebula galaxy cloud dark shining star stars star cluster open globular planet sun mercury venus earth mars jupiter saturn uranus neptune pluto ceres fobos deimos moon titan waxed europe calist ganymede charontera hydra nix comet aste group hydra nix comet aste group hydra nix comet band galactic planetary supercluster emission reflection absorption dust gas atmosphere x-ray gamma quasar pulsar herbig-haro constellation asterism fleeting meteor meteorite satellite iss station rockettelescope hubble chandra spitzer nustar xmm-newton most very vlt vla vst view herschel soar ssro sloan rosetta rostar ketar keckar ketar ketar ketar subtle rosat ketar roster ketsar keta subar kitty wilson observatory pigeon jello horizons voyager mpg mycron merlin maven express mariner magellan juno grand canarias gemini hawk galileo galex gaia fuse digited dawn clementine cassini apollo apex soul hole aguj eros north pole south solar system empty local big bang hidden coronalunar solar crater supermoon blood eclipse total partial concealment luminescence refraction ring flash transit protuberance filament spot sunspots andromeda messier dwarf physical physics ngc ic trio arp melotte doradus barnard pillars trunk nuro head swan cygnus sh2 shapley mz rho sagittarius tarantula magallanes large small triangle pickering variable tower binary spectroscopic bennu thule carinae cygnicom coma virgo quartet quintet chain energy color markarian molecular triton supernova nova remnant explosion front shock shock einstein caldwell darwin huygens ptolomeo halley piggot gyerton keplentil dd gillett harder keterton gilton kepleton dilton graveyard copernicus lacaille loys pierre hawking science scientists sky rainbow lenticular spiral elliptic barred arm arms region regions vdb rcw year light parsec degree degrees celsius farenheit kelvin minute minutes arc minute arch hidden full dark particles atom atoms temperature millions thousand light spectrum